Living in a Big City Doesn’t Mean you Can Drive in Traffic – Here’s 7 Reasons Why

Many times people who have moved to a big city or live in a big city automatically think that they can drive in any traffic, anywhere; but they’re wrong.  Big city traffic is different everywhere.

Because there is no standard definition for “good driving,” people tend to use their own unique, individual definitions. So, a slow and cautious driver could have a totally different definition of “good driving” than someone who likes to drive fast and aggressively.

In one study, college students completed questionnaires asking them to rank specific driving skills, assess their own driving ability, and assess what driving skills were most important to them compared to others.

As predicted, participants believed that they were exceptional drivers—but only according to their own definitions of good driving. Participants assumed that others would rank important driving skills, like checking blind spots or using turn signals, differently than they would.

Here’s 7 reasons why big city traffic isn’t always going to be your thing.

   1.Not all cities are the same.

Every city is different when it comes to traffic rules, pedestrians, and generally everything. That’s the point of this article, after all.

So watch out for different things while you’re travelling, and look the city traffic laws up before you get there. You might be a good driver at home, but in another place, where you don’t know the rules and people, you could easily be considered a bad driver, by the people on the road and in your car.

     2. Being good at weaving in and out of cars gets people mad.

Yes, that’s right! It’s not cool, it’s annoying. Other drivers are trying to avoid accidents and still get to their destinations in a timely manner, too. Weaving between cars and constantly switching lanes trying to get ahead highers the risk of rear-ending someone/being rear-ended.

     3. Weather is different

In some cities, it snows. Alot. Or it rains. Constantly. Or the sun sits right below your visor during the entire drive. Yes, these things will drastically affect your traffic navigating abilities. Make sure you think about whether you will be capable of driving in extreme weather conditions. You may want to opt for public transport if you think you could be a danger to other drivers om the road.

 

     4.  You didn’t research that cities average traffic jam times

“oops, we’re an hour late for dinner”

“I’ll add an extra half hour for traffic.” Well, that might not be enough. Be sure to look up the traffic times before you set off, or plan your outings during a time when you know it is not rush hour.

 

 

     5. There are unspoken rules by locals.

When you are driving at home, in the big city where you live, you can probably tell pretty easily when someone is an out-of-towner. You see the licence plate and think “I knew it!” That’s because in every city the locals drive a certain way. They are used to different, unspoken rules, and they know the things that are annoying to other drivers. In one city it may be normal to never use a blinker, in another everyone might go 15 over the speed limit. Be aware of your surroundings, and pay attention to how the locals are driving.

    6. You think you’re pretty good driver, and that you’re surrounded by morons who aren’t.

Like we said earlier in the article, because there is no standard definition for “good driving,” people tend to use their own unique, individual definitions. So, a slow and cautious driver could have a totally different definition of “good driving” than someone who likes to drive fast and aggressively. Be aware that even though you think someone is being an a**hole driver, they don’t think they are, and honking your horn and cussing at them might just get you followed home! Patience on the road is safer than road rage. But honk if someone pulls out in front of you!

   7. Crowding the car upfront on a hill.

Have you never driven on a hill? in traffic? Well, people who drive stick especially will hate you for crowding the car in front. And if you’re driving a manual for the first time on a hill be aware that this is a common misdemeanor of bad drivers.

 

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Author: Gemma Falconer

Gemma is a Senior Campaign Specialist for Citrix and GoToMeeting. She has been part of the Demand Generation team for the past five years, looking after anything from webinars to content creation. In her spare time she enjoys playing volleyball, trying to learn Portuguese and eating cake – lots of cake. Connect with her on LinkedIn and Twitter @GemmaFalconer

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